Monday, December 20, 2010

FB Report: Lots of Links on Speculative Fiction -- 12/20/10

Reading For the Future Via Valerie's Wall, who received it from Vonda McIntyre: Free ebook to be given away for a limited time in multiple formats.
Book View Cafe - McIntyre - The Starfarers Quartet
http://www.bookviewcafe.com/index.php/McIntyre-The-Starfarers-Quartet
www.bookviewcafe.com
Book View Cafe - Because you can never have too many ebooks
[12/19/10]

Reading For the Future In the Broad Universe science fiction catalog are numerous novels marked as YA suitable. These are listed in the Discussions thread for YA suitables.
All authors listed are members of the organization. Also, there is a catalog of fantasy works and children's literature. Visit the webpage
http://www.broaduniverse.org/catalog/science-fiction
for ISBN, publisher, pub. date, and also awards and award nominations.~Valerie
Welcome to Broad Universe - Broad Universe | Promoting science fiction, fantasy, and horror written.

http://www.broaduniverse.org/
www.broaduniverse.org
Broad Universe is an international organization dedicated to promoting, encouraging, honoring, and celebrating women writers and editors in science fiction, fantasy, horror and other speculative genres.
[12/18/10]

Reading For the Future Reading IN the Future?
Color E-Readers Open Way for Picture Books

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/15/business/media/15ebooks.html?_r=1&hpw
www.nytimes.com
The abilities of devices like the iPad and the Nook Color are leading publishers to produce illustrated e-books, particularly picture books for children.
[12/15/10]

Reading For the Future Evelyn Perkins, RN,MS, PMH-BC, NE-BC, is a nurse who is fascinated with the emerging science of nanomedicine. She has written the first book in a trilogy of children's si-fi books, Nanorobots and the Hunt for H1NO1. It introduces nanomedicine concepts in a thrilling adventure where 2 virologists and their 4 kids risk everything in their hunt for the killer virus, H1NO1 and the evil scientist who genetically engineered
Evelyn Perkins

http://www.facebook.com/profile
[12/15/10]

Reading For the Future Very interesting blog article about Mega-Scale Planet Engineering.
Dark Roasted Blend: Megastructures: Bigger-Than-Worlds

http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2010/12/megastructures-bigger-than-worlds.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheThrillingWonderStory+%28Dark+Roasted+Blend%29
www.darkroastedblend.com
Overheard in the future: "We already talked about how to add extra storage space to your continent by turning mountain ranges into bookcases, turning lakes into bath tubs, and continental shelves into decks (see also our popular Future Plate Tectonics article). Well, in this special episode we're go...
[12/15/10]

Reading For the Future I just found this site. I believe they are still working on it and are continually looking for updates. An excellent resource, even before it's finished.
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/index.cgi
www.isfdb.org
The ISFDB is a community effort to catalog works of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. It links together various types of bibliographic data: author bibliographies, publication bibliographies, award listings, magazine content listings, anthology and collection content listings, and forthcoming bo
[12/13/10]

Reading For the Future I like both - separately or together
There's not that much difference between mysteries and science fiction, really.
http://io9.com/5711775/theres-not-that-much-difference-between-mysteries-and-science-fiction-really

io9.com
What's the difference between mysteries and science fiction? Not as much as you'd imagine, says Michael Marshall Smith who's written both.
[12/13/10]

Other Walls


via Valerie: Valerie Coskrey via David Brin: Reality games!
David Brin
Smash an asteroid into Earth on your computer – and calculate the resulting damage. Impact: Earth is an interactive website that allows you to enter the diameter, density & velocity of the incoming object, its angle of entry and target on Earth. Bam! Gives data on tsunamis, crater size, seismic effects, airblasts, ejecta, as well as global changes (will it shift earth’s axis?) Great for classrooms.
Impact: Earth!

http://www.purdue.edu/IMPACTEARTH
www.purdue.edu
Impact: Earth! written by Gareth Collins, H. Jay Melosh and Robert Marcus Developed by ITaP for Purdue University.View the text-only version. Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 USA, (765) 494-4600© 2010 Purdue University. An equal access, equal opportunity unive
[12/19/10]

Valerie Coskrey via David Brin:
Darryl Cunningham Investigates: Climate Change

http://darryl-cunningham.blogspot.com/2010/12/climate-change.html
darryl-cunningham.blogspot.com
Wow, excellent. That's one smart penguin!One very small typo I found: "The Kochs want to pay less tax, keep more profits, and be retrained by less regulation." I'm pretty sure you meant "restrained" not "retrained".
[12/19/10]

Valerie Coskrey via Cie McCullough: Merry Christmas to all.

THE DIGITAL STORY OF NATIVITY - ( or Christmas 2.0 )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZrf0PbAGSk
www.youtube.com
To see other great viral videos visit my facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/viral.videos.nr1 How social media, web and mobile tell the story of the Nativity. Christmas story told through Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google, Wikipedia, Google Maps, GMail, Foursquare, Amazon... Times change, the
[12/19/10]

Valerie Coskrey via Pamela Sargent: Pamela writes both YA and Adult sci fi. Each is an exciting read.
After decades, 'Seed' bears fruit - Times Union
http://www.timesunion.com/entertainment/article/After-decades-Seed-bears-fruit-904477.php

www.timesunion.com
Almost 30 years after science-fiction author Pamela Sargent introduced audiences to a faraway planet that a sentient starship had populated with people, animals and plants to resemble Earth, she has finished her "Seed" trilogy. A character named Nuy, the daughter of original settlers of the planet,
[12/19/10]

Valerie Coskrey via Lynda Williams: I reviewed a book in a saga I hope to read more of.
Valerie's Soapbox
soapboxbyval.blogspot.com
I recently discovered a new science fiction universe to explore. The deftly built Okal Rel Universe is visited through the books of the Okal Rel Saga by Lynda Williams and her proteges. The central character of the saga is introduced in The Courtesan Prince as Von who is, well, a popular gigolo of t
[12/19/10]

Valerie Coskrey Free ebook that is suitable for YA
The Punishment of Phoebus Apollo, an Ebook by Brenna Lyons

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/8301
www.smashwords.com
Download "The Punishment of Phoebus Apollo" for free from Smashwords.com. From the ancient Greek myths... When Apollo forgets the tender art of mercy, his father arranges a lesson he'll never forget. Adapted by Brenna Lyons to expand on the original tale.
[12/18/10]

Valerie Coskrey via David Brin:
David Brin's Blog: Tomorrow Happens -

http://open.salon.com/blog/david_brin
open.salon.com
Tomorrow Happens - ...trends slamming at us from the dark
[12/18/10]

Valerie Coskrey via Bobby DuFault
Valerie Coskrey: sounds like a memorial for past fans and authors
The Celestial Convention - Star Ceremony
Location:RustyCon 2011
Time:12:
[12/18/10]

Valerie Coskrey I found this article when I was exploring criteria for children's literature. To me it is a humanistic approach to judging the multi-cultural value of a children's lit work. In other words, I personally agreed with it and and liked the way my values were expressed, even though I am not Jewish. It is an older article that I do believe is still relevant.

Assessing Children`s Literature

http://www.adl.org/education/assessing.asp
www.adl.org
Assessing Childrens Literature
[12/18/10]

Valerie Coskrey Found this item about 5 questions for evaluating your non-profit.
Charitable Advisors: Can Five Short Questions Change the Nonprofit World?

http://charitableadvisors.blogspot.com/2010/11/can-five-short-questions-change.html
charitableadvisors.blogspot.com
[12/15/10]

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

FB Report: Lots of Links on Speculative Fiction -- 12/15/10

Traffic Report


This is the traffic report for the page during the first week of December for Reading For the Future page on Facebook:
213 monthly active users; 20 since last week
286 people like this; 3 since last week
22 wall posts and comments this week; 10 since last week
58 visits this week 13; since last week

From the Wall


Reading For the Future I just found this site. I believe they are still working on it and are continually looking for updates. An excellent resource, even before it's finished.
href="http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/index.cgi
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database
www.isfdb.org
The ISFDB is a community effort to catalog works of science fiction, fantasy, and horror. It links together various types of bibliographic data: author bibliographies, publication bibliographies, award listings, magazine content listings, anthology and collection content listings, and forthcoming bo...
[12/14/10]

Reading For the Future I like both - separately or together.
http://io9.com/5711775/theres-not-that-much-difference-between-mysteries-and-science-fiction-really
There's not that much difference between mysteries and science fiction, really.
io9.com
What's the difference between mysteries and science fiction? Not as much as you'd imagine, says Michael Marshall Smith who's written both.
[12/14/10]

Reading For the Future I personally doubt any son of Kurt Vonnegut could be 'average'.
http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Life-with-a-dad-called-Kurt-875899.php
Life with a dad called Kurt - Times Union
www.timesunion.com
A shy and socially awkward boy, Mark Vonnegut lived in fear of being the target of the most withering question possible that could be lobbed by his father, the famous author Kurt Vonnegut: "Do you want to be average?"
[12/13/10]

Reading For the Future Give the gift of SF! I am. My son is getting Mike Resnick's "New Dreams for Old", a series of short stories. If there is a young person on your list, give a book. If not, find a young person to add to your list :D
[12/13/10]

Reading For the Future Here is the reference to an author post mentioned below. Robert J. Sawyer writes books suitable for teens.
http://rff-reflections.blogspot.com/2010/12/wake-far-seer-and-their-author-robert-j.html
Reading for the Future Reflections: Wake, Far-Seer and their author Robert J. Sawyer
rff-reflections.blogspot.com
[12/9/10]

Reading For the Future There are two new RFF Reflections articles this week. One is a book review; the other is a reference to an author and his books. Here is the latest post.
http://rff-reflections.blogspot.com/2010/12/book-review-krysia-andersons-misfit.html
Reading for the Future Reflections: Book Review: Krysia Anderson's Misfit Leaves Home
rff-reflections.blogspot.com
[12/9/10]



Reading For the Future I came across a review of RFF member Lynda Williams' book Avim's Oath today. Turns out that it is considered a teen or YA book.
Visit this link to read the review.
http://www.umanitoba.ca/outreach/cm/vol17/no8/avimsoath.html
In the review, Ronald Hore recommends Avim's Oath (The Okal Rel Saga, Part Six ) by Lynda William...s for ages 13 and up; grades 8 and up. ~Valerie C.
See More
http://www.umanitoba.ca/outreach/cm/vol17/no8/avimsoath.html
CM Magazine: Avim's Oath. (The Okal Rel Saga, Part Six).
www.umanitoba.ca
Lynda Williams. Calgary, AB: EDGE Science Fiction and Fantasy Publishing, 2010. 266 pp., pbk., $16.95. ISBN 978-1-894063-35-7.
[12/9/10]


Reading For the Future [in comment: posted by David-Glenn Anderson via the RFF Yahoo group]
http://www.facebook.com/notes/reading-for-the-future/have-you-given-away-a-book-today-by-kristen-lillvis/177651835595488
Have you given away a book today? by Kristen Lillvis
AboutSF Saving the world through Science Fiction   Have you given away a book today?...
[12/8/10]

Recent Activity:

Reading For the Future discussed Books Suitable for Youth on the Reading For the Future discussion board.
Reading For the Future discussed Books for Middle school on the Reading For the Future discussion board.
3 more similar stories
[12/8/10]

Reading For the Future A page of reviews of graphic novels.~Valerie C.
http://blog.patrickrothfuss.com/2010/12/delicious-webcomics-and-guest-appearances/
Delicious Webcomics and Guest Appearances
blog.patrickrothfuss.com
Before I talk about today’s donation, I need to mention that some of the auctions we’re running will be over soon. Most specifically, the signed ARC from Neil Gaiman and the signed collection of Girl Genius trades.
[12/8/10]

Reading For the Future A graphic novel give-away in support of Heifer International, a worthwhile charity.~Valerie C.
http://blog.patrickrothfuss.com/2010/11/worldbuilders-2010/
Worldbuilders 2010
blog.patrickrothfuss.com
Heifer International is my favorite charity. It helps people raise themselves up out of poverty and starvation. All over the world Heifer promotes education, sustainable agriculture, and local industry.
[12/8/10]

Reading For the Future [in comment: I have posted the entirety of my GeekMom article in the notes section, so there is a copy on hand for anyone who wishes to reproduce it.
~Cie]
Reading For the Future
http://www.facebook.com/notes/reading-for-the-future/reading-for-the-future-uses-scifi-to-spark-kids-sense-of-wonder/177002672327071
Reading for the Future Uses SciFi to Spark Kids’ Sense of Wonder
I love reading Science Fiction. Well, I love reading almost any type of Speculative Fiction, whether it be Science, Fantasy, Alternate History, Supernatural, maybe even a bit of Horror around Halloween...
[12/6/10]

Reading For the Future This is the first image ever taken of Earth from the surface of a planet beyond the Moon. It was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit one hour before sunrise on the 63rd Martian day, or sol, of its mission. (March 8, 2004)
From the website www.lightsinthedark.com/
The image is a mosaic of images taken by the rover's navigation camera showing a broad view of the sky, and an image taken by the rover's panoramic camera of Earth. The contrast in the panoramic camera image was increased two times to make Earth easier to see.The inset shows a combination of four panoramic camera images zoomed in on Earth. The arrow points to Earth. Earth was too faint to be detected in images taken with the panoramic camera's color filters.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/Texas A&M
Image: http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs611.ash2/156321_159513910759937_128034957241166_326773_1945219_s.jpg
[12/6/10]

Reading For the Future Now open for business. Large selection of -free- ebooks too :)
http://books.google.com/ebooks?uid=2278874564547928826&as_coll=1220&source=gbs_ws2_subj&as_brr=5
Science Fiction - Google eBookstore
books.google.com
* General * Adventure * High Tech * Military * Short Stories * Space Opera
[12/6/10]

Reading For the Future Many of the works of H. Beam Piper are available free as ebooks. His works are suitable for YA and can be used to support science concept lessons. For instance Fuzzy Sapiens is perfect for teaching response to environmental stress, carrying capacity, nutrients/nutrition, endangered species, and ecology for grades 6-10.
http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p
Browse By Author: P - Project Gutenberg
www.gutenberg.org
33000+ free ebooks online
[12/6/10]

Reading For the Future Baen Books has listed its books for young adults. It is primarily a list of adult sci fi that most consider suitable for youth. Maybe a couple of the books are actually YA. It is incomplete, as stated by the editor of the list and as I know because I have read several Baen books not yet listed. Check it out and maybe help Toni complete the list. ~ Valerie C.
http://www.baen.com/ya_list.asp
www.baen.com
[12/5/10]

Reading For the Future VOYA reports on a Scholastic report on what motivates children to read.
http://www.voya.com/2010/09/29/new-study/
New Study on Reading in the Digital Age
www.voya.com
Scholastic surveyed 1,045 children age 6-17 and their parents (for a total of 2,090 respondents) in an online survey in the spring of 2010.
[12/5/10]

From other Walls


David Brin A one-word interview: Science fiction authors respond in 50 or fewer words to the word SPARK. Here is my response, along with those of Orson Scott Card, Nancy Kress, Jay Lake, Larry Niven and others.
http://emunderwood.com/2010/12/13/one-word-interview-spark/
One Word Interview: SPARK
emunderwood.com
Spark is the seed of a story, a flash of an idea...
[12/14/10]

Valerie Coskrey Just finished reading Lynda Williams' The Courtesan Prince. Enjoyed it immensely. Will be writing a review in my blog soon.
http://www.edgewebsite.com/books/courtesanprince/cp-catalog.html
www.edgewebsite.com
[12/14/10]
In comment:
Valerie Coskrey: To RFF group: Unfortunately I would not, as a teacher, recommend this to YA due to adult sexual situations and abuse referenced, although not explicitly depicted.
As a parent, Yeah, read it and learn about human nature--but my kids read and watched whatever interested them. It is a rousing beginning to a space opera.
[12/14/10]

Julie Czerneda I had to share. Wow!
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-11988466
Voyager near Solar System's edge
www.bbc.co.uk
The most distant spacecraft from Earth, Voyager 1, returns new data suggesting it is very close to leaving the Solar System.
[12/14/10]

Bobbie DuFault RustyCon is getting closer. Have you checked out the Web page? RustyCon doesn't run all on it's own. We need... http://fb.me/xvtLdMju

Thursday, December 9, 2010

Book Review: Krysia Anderson's Misfit Leaves Home

Princess Victoria is barely old enough to leave home, but her sense of identity is not what her family desires it to be. So she frequently slips out of the house to sneak off to the spaceport to watch a world beyond her reach. One afternoon her trip to the ports lands her in a brawl and introduces her to a prince who both complicates her life and offers her a chance to travel to another planet and become the person she dreams of being.

Teen author Krysia Anderson perfectly captures the emotional intensity of the confusion, sibling-rivalry, breakdown of inter-family closeness, social awkwardness, and everyday frustrations of a young adolescent in this pre-coming-of-age novella. The action is swift, the emotions real and intense; get ready to relive teen angst when you read this. Along the way, social issues like class and race are touched on and treated with humanistic sensitivity, all taking place in another time and another universe, constructed beautifully with a few deft descriptions and references.

Anderson writes in the Okal Rel Universe of author Lynda Williams. I chose to read this short novella before reading any of Williams' books. Yet I found myself comfortably inhabiting a world not Earth among a people not my own of a societal structure not quite like ours. Still there was just enough allusion to the complex Okal Rel Universe constructs to make me want to read other books in this series. I want to read them not to explain this one, it needed no additional background to be understood; but because the characters and world-building were sufficient to make the Okal Rel Universe come alive and become a place I now want to visit.

Personally, I am impatient to read the promised sequel(s) of this storyline. Krysia Alexander is a gifted storyteller, with just the right mix of human motivations, frustrated emotions, comic relief, and goal-oriented action that overcomes setbacks. I truly believe the middle school and young adult audience will enjoy this one.

Teachers, this book, being 71 pages, is most useful for a book report for those students who like short books yet rich enough to provide thought-provoking questions on motivation, customs, social issues of class, social expectations and friendship. There is mention of genotyping and space flight enough to provide stimulus for a few science questions on genetics, the ethics of publishing personal genotypes, and space flight compared to atmospheric flight. These topics are part of the story, but the science is only marginally part of the book. In all cases, a lesson on one of the topics might be introduced by referring to the instances in the book.

For more information about the Okal Rel Universe as well as any other stories and books by Krysia Anderson in the series, visit the website of Lynda Williams.

This book is a bit hard to find. I had to order it from Amazon.com. The major book stores Barnes & Noble and Borders will order it for you, but probably will not have it on the shelf.

Reviewed by Valerie Coskrey. 
Valerie Coskrey's Classroom Tools and Ideas and
Valerie's Soapbox

Previous mention of this book was made in another article of this blog.
Krysia Anderson can be visited on Facebook.

Wake, Far-Seer and their author Robert J. Sawyer

A Note from Valerie

Robert J. Sawyer
While on Facebook I joined in a dialog on the wall of Robert J. Sawyer. From the comments of his other Friends I became so intrigued that I decided to explore his websites to see just what books he has written. Since I have not yet read any of his books, the website, Facebook wall, and blog are all I personally have to go by. This is what I have discovered so far.~Valerie C.
This photo of Sawyer is from his Facebook Album and is a "Photo of Robert J. Sawyer by Christina Molendyk of Argent Dawn Photography, Calgary," says Sawyer.


The Science Fiction of Robert J. Sawyer

Website
A visit to the website Robert J. Sawyer (Wake page) is a beautiful experience. The site and the book covers are all gorgeous and displayed creatively. The information is rich in useful content. The old and new blogs are not much of a visual feast, but the postings are all pure Robert: creative and informative (The old blog is a closer artistic match to the website, but is, I think, an archived page on the website itself.).

But we at RFF are more interested in the books, especially those that we can suggest for youth.
Books
Robert Sawyer's Wake has a main character that is 15. This, by some definitions, places the novel into the YA category, or at least the YA suitable category.  Also, "Wake is a current Hugo and Aurora Award finalist — and a Globe and Mail national bestseller!" claims the blurb on Sawyer's blog, http://sfwriter.com/blog.

A second Sawyer book for youth is Far-Seer, reviewed by "KLIATT: Young Adult Paperback Book Guide (Newton, Massachusetts) (starred review "highlighting an exceptional book"): 'This is a truly great piece of SF.'" [quoted from the review page: http://sfwriter.com/req1.htm]. I suspect that all 3 books in this trilogy will be equally suitable for YA and possibly younger.
Impressions
I explored Sawyer's website and discovered that this man who I had befriended on Facebook is much more prominent an author than I had expected. He has won numerous awards and is considered one of the top 30 in Canadian publishing according to the list produced by the publishing trade journal Quill & Quire.

But what got me interested in his books--which I must admit I have not yet read, although I have watched FastForward on TV--is a comment in a dialog on Sawyer's Facebook wall.
"Yochanan Urias
Before I actually met and talked with you, Robert I actually thought you were a believer, or at least a moderate agnostic from the thoughtful and kind way the characters in your novels approached religion. After discussing this with you at...Los Con a few years ago, I still find your writing to be thoughtful and respectful. Your wonderful character driven novels have characters that feel so real, that grapple with issues of faith and science. They neither ignore it all together or sweepingly dismiss it all. I appreciate that. I am a believer, but I do not celebrate Christmas in anyway. (I also collect all the Star Trek ornaments, but they sit beautifully on a shelf year round, the better to keep them mint-in-box, lol). I actually celebrate Hannukah. I am at peace and wish the same on all. Enjoy your celebrations no matter what you believe or not. And may you and your family have a wonderful time. Shalom!"

Intrigued, I visited the website, blog, and forum of Sawyer. This is what I found:
  1. Gotta read these books! The current book list is here: http://sfwriter.com/index.htm
  2. There is enough information on the page on Wake to build lessons for a science or technology class. Maybe even enough to begin a unit plan on computer technology for a physical science or technology class.
  3. After reading passages from his "fan fiction: Star Trek: Armada chapters, I like his writing style. One quickly enters the "universe" in which he writes and gets swept along emotionally into the story and its action.
  4. I suspect many of his works will be suitable for YA.

    • Far-Seer, the first novel in the Quintaglio Ascension universe trilogy (so far), tells the story of an dinosaur-alien scientist in a world of intelligent dinosaurs that is analogous to Galileo's story. In a collection of reviews, one called the book a "coming of age" novel and several reviewers claimed the characters were fun and the stories were exciting--perfect conditions for YA status.

    • Again, the book's webpages have info rich enough for lesson development. And what a way to introduce the scientific methods and Galilean lessons in science classes!

    • Additionally, he edited and wrote a story for the anthology Distant Early Warnings: Canada's Best Science Fiction, which includes a story by Julie Czerneda, who is famous in RFF for her lessons and books focusing on using science fiction in the classroom.

    • And here is a quote from the Reviews page for Far-Seer  "KLIATT: Young Adult Paperback Book Guide (Newton, Massachusetts) (starred review "highlighting an exceptional book"): 'This is a truly great piece of SF.'"
  5. I hope he keeps writing for a long time to come. I suspect many of you have already included his books on your book lists, but I am just discovering his works.

Why Sci Fi?

While exploring the links to Robert J. Sawyer, catch this essay The purpose of science fiction that Sawyer posted to his blog on 11/16/10.

Share

If you have suggestions as to which of Sawyer's books are suitable to youth, please list the book(s) in the comments. I will oversee getting the list added to the book lists in the discussion threads of the RFF page on Facebook.

Sunday, December 5, 2010

FB Report: Lots of Links on Speculative Fiction -- 12/5/10

Reading For the Future VOYA reports on a Scholastic report on what motivates children to read.
New Study on Reading in the Digital Age;
http://www.voya.com/2010/09/29/new-study

www.voya.com
Scholastic surveyed 1,045 children age 6-17 and their parents (for a total of 2,090 respondents) in an online survey in the spring of 2010.
[12/4/10]

Reading For the Future [Writer's Workshop] Applications for 2011 workshop are accepted from December 1st, 2010 to March 1st, 2011.
Clarion Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers' Workshop;
http://clarion.ucsd.edu/

clarion.ucsd.edu
Established in 1968, Clarion is widely recognized as a premier training ground for aspiring writers of fantasy and science fiction.
[12/4/10]

Reading For the Future Protect your local libraries, everyone. This seems to be a growing trend.
A library without the books - The Boston Globe
http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/09/04/a_library_without_the_books/
www.boston.com
Instead of a library, the academy is spending nearly $500,000 to create a “learning center’’. In place of the stacks, they are spending $42,000 on three large flat-screen TVs that will project data from the Internet and $20,000 on special laptop-friendly study carrels. Where the reference desk was, ...
[12/3/10]

Posted by Dave Anderson: I have changed my one email to dander1938@q dot com DGA [SPACE dot SPACE ADDED BY BLOGMASTER]
[11/29/10]

Reading For the Future Walter Jon Williams, Nancy Kress, and special lecturer Jack Skillingstead
Taos Ski Valley, NM
Taos ToolBox, two-week Master Class in Science Fiction and Fantasy, July 10-23, 2011
http://taostoolbox.com

taostoolbox.com
Taos ToolBox, two-week Master Class in Science Fiction and Fantasy , July 10-23, 2011, taught by Walter Jon Williams, Nancy Kress, and special lecturer, Jack Skillingstead. Taos Toolbox will be a graduate workshop designed to bring your science fiction and fantasy writing to the next level....
[11/29/10]

Comments to this post:
Dave Anderson Nancy wrote one of the three publiswhed(sic)books in David Brin's Out of Time Series. I still would like db to write book zero and restart the series. DGA
November 29 at 7:13pm

Dave Anderson db is David Brin. He did say at one time that he could do a book zero. He is I think getting another book ready. DGA
November 29 at 7:44pm

Reading For the Future E-Books are great, but I really hope they never completely replace physical books. Especially not in institutions of learning.~Cie
http://blogs.houstonpress.com/hairballs/2010/11/lamar_highs_library_ousts_book.php>
Lamar High's Library Ousts Books
http://blogs.houstonpress.com/hairballs/2010/11/lamar_highs_library_ousts_book.php

blogs.houstonpress.com
Just adding a coffee shop to a neighborhood library so people can feel like they're in Starbucks and ultra hip was apparently too passe a trend for Principal James McSwain of Lamar High School. Finishing up a week ago, McSwain has thrown out nearly all the books and filled the space they were unnec...
[11/28/10]

[see also (Re: group emails):
Lamar High's Library Ousts Books, Re-Opens as Coffee Shop;
http://www.blogger.com/post-create.g?blogID=2571289882944855414
]

Comments to this post:
Dave Anderson I still like the feel of a real book. Recommend Lane's It's a Book for all you ereaders. DGA
November 29 at 9:45pm

Reading For the Future "I prefer Sprague de Camp's old definition, that a science fiction story is merely a human story with a human problem and a human solution that could not happen without its scientific content. Now, if you just plug the word fantasy into the gaps, the cloak covers so much more of the ground that science fiction easily fits inside."
Diane Duane says all fiction—even scifi—is a subset of fantasy
http://io9.com/5700553/diane-duane-says-all-fictioneven-scifiis-a-subset-of-fantasy

io9.com
In an interview with io9, Young Wizards series author Diane Duane talks about her latest book, learning to build video games, and explains her love of science.
[11/28/10]

Comments to this post:
Dave Anderson I read speculative fiction. Fantasy is one neigborhhood. Does it matter what we call it? Yes, originally RFF supported stories like those written by the Killer Bs. That was 1995ish Reading tastes change. So RFF is going back to our roots and give the kid a good SF book. DGA
November 29 at 7:51pm ·

Reading For the Future Thank you Meg Turville-Heitz for leading to this Science-fictional Thanksgiving Grace
John Scalzi - Saying Thanksgiving Grace, the Science-fictional Way - Filmcritic.com Feature
http://www.filmcritic.com/features/2010/11/a-science-fiction-thanksgiving-grace/

www.filmcritic.com
John Scalzi - Saying Thanksgiving Grace, the Science-fictional Way - Dear Great and Gracious Lord,This Thanksgiving, we pause to reflect on all the bounty and good fortune with which you have graced us this year. Thank you, Lord, for this feast we have in front of us and for the family and friends w...
[11/25/10]

Comment to this post:
Reading For the Future and thanks Chris McKitterick too :)
November 25 at 8:51am

Reading For the Future In looking for "Science Fiction: the Classroom in Orbit. a Mini-Course Text From Educational Impact" by Beverly Friend, which Jan Howard Finder recommended, I found this interesting blog:
Biology in Science Fiction: Using Science Fiction to teach Science in India
http://sciencefictionbiology.blogspot.com/2007/06/using-science-fiction-to-teach-science.html

sciencefictionbiology.blogspot.com
We have tried to introduce following to lay people using tableaux based on sf stories.A. Cloning :Along with a mythological story sf dpictions on cloning very well explained the process and implications of the emerging technology to lay people.B. Biotechnology : The science fictional biotech tre...
[11/23/10]

Comment to this post:
Dave Anderson Beverly often does the more Academic track at sf cons. RFF does more SF in the classroom such as MilPhil 2001. Both support SFF literacy with RFF targeting the middle graders who really do not read anything. Boys Read has a handle on how Jon does this. DGA
[11/29/10]

Reading For the Future RFF member and author has posted lessons on her web site for teaching with science fiction.
Julie Czerneda Official Site
http://www.czerneda.com

www.czerneda.com
Julie Czerneda's Official Site,Science Fiction and Fantasy Author and Editor, Information on her Work, Stories, and Educator Materials
[11/23/10]

Comment to this post:
Dave Anderson Julie -- I need to go to AboutSF. Understand Scientific literacy is there. I was going to correct RFF url. Keep writing, DGA
[12/3/10]

Reading For the Future This link appeared in a comment to Cie's Geek Mom post listed below. (That is, it appeared on the Geek Mom site). Thought you might like it.~Valerie
Science In My Fiction
http://crossedgenres.com/simf/

crossedgenres.com
You have two friends, your two best friends, both witty, fun, and thoughtful. An hour or so spent with either one leaves your brain buzzing with new ideas and insights. “I gotta get these two together,” you think.
[11/23/10]

Posted by Jan Howard Finder A few, well maybe a little bit more than a few, years ago, I picked up the following boo from a friend of mine. I almost feel it should be reprinted.

Science Fiction: the Classroom in Orbit. a Mini-Course Text From Educational Impact
by Friend, Beverly
[11/23/10]

Comments to this post:
Reading For the Future Jan? You picked up a 'boo'?
~Cie
November 23 at 10:29pm

Jan Howard Finder Actually, a boo hoo, as the book is no longer available. :-)

I never said, I could spell. This is why I like dictionaries. I have several, including the OED in 2 volumes.
November 26 at 11:00am ·

Reading For the Future I am very happy to tell you that today there is an article at GeekMom.com about Reading For the Future :)
GeekMom » Blog Archive » Reading for the Future Uses SciFi to Spark Kids’ Sense of Wonder
http://www.geekmom.com/2010/11/reading-for-the-future-uses-scifi-to-spark-kids-sense-of-wonder/

www.geekmom.com
I love reading Science Fiction. Well, I love reading almost any type of Speculative Fiction, whether it be Science, Fantasy, Alternate History, Supernatural, maybe even a bit of Horror around Halloween.
[11/23/10]

Comments to this post:
Reading For the Future Good News - the article was also posted by the Gifted Homeschoolers Forum! (I had nothing to do with this)
~Cie
November 23 at 8:19pm ·

Reading For the Future So far this has been reposted by four friends and two groups - that I know of! :D
~Cie
November 24

Reading For the Future Science - For people who think reality is more interesting than anything they could make up.
[Shows an image of the cover of Science at this url] http://photos-h.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs488.ash2/76186_156269447751050_128034957241166_305363_4564335_s.jpg
[11/22/10]

RECENT ACTIVITY
Reading For the Future discussed sf for social studies on the Reading For the Future discussion board.

Reading For the Future Check out the new Reflections Collection that was posted to the Reading for the Future blog Reflections today.
Reading for the Future Reflections: Reflections Collections -- 11/22/10
http://rff-reflections.blogspot.com/2010/11/reflections-collections-112210.html

rff-reflections.blogspot.com
[11/22/10]

Reading For the Future From Dave Anderson, who does the day to day grunt work for RFF:
"I received the approved Articles of Incorporation from the State of Utah this last week. I am now working on 501(c)(3) status. Thank everyone who helped RFF to progress to this level in only 14 years. LOL Dave Anderson"
[11/21/10]

Comment to this post
Reading For the Future Please also remember, Talking RFF aka RFF @ yahoogroups.com is open and available to anyone. I encourage everyone with an interest in RFF to join.
[11/21/10]

Reading For the Future This sight lists awards given to children's books, but does not list the Golden Duck Awards. It does show images of the major science fiction award trophies, though. ~Valerie
AwardWeb: Literary Award Information and Photos
http://dpsinfo.com/awardweb/

[This page shows photos and more info: http://www.awardweb.info/~Valerie, rffblogmaster]
dpsinfo.com
Literary Award Information and Photos
[11/21/10]

Reading For the Future I also found this site. Both this site and the one below list the Golden Duck Awards.~Valerie
Science Fiction Awards Watch
http://www.sfawardswatch.com/

www.sfawardswatch.com
All about science ficiton awards
[11/21/10]

Reading For the Future I found this site for literary awards on the web today.
The Locus Index to Science Fiction Awards, compiled by Mark R. Kelly
http://www.locusmag.com/SFAwards/index.html

www.locusmag.com
Listings, indexes, and tallies of SF, fantasy, and horror awards.
[11/21/10]

Reading For the Future
Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Opens in Indianapolis
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/20/us/20vonnegut.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=a23

www.nytimes.com
The author Kurt Vonnegut’s friends and family agree that his museum belongs in Indianapolis, the hometown with which he had a complicated and not always complimentary relationship.
[11/20/10]

Reading For the Future Teaching with Jules Verne
One of the great resources to be found at our Website!
Reading for the Future
http://www.readingforfuture.com/Jules%20Verne.htm

www.readingforfuture.com
Teaching with Jules Verne. Considered by some “The Father of Science Fiction”, in the 1800’s Jules Verne predicted many of the technologies that are reality today. Though Verne was not a scientist, he did have a passionate interest in it as well as a brilliant imagination. He was one of the few writ...
[11/20/10]

from Valerie's Wall

Lynda Williams
A funny video any published writer can relate to, shared to SF Canada by √Člisabeth Vonarburghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9fc-crEFDw
[12/1/10]

Science Fiction Book Club
Speculation is high about the script for JJ Abrams' second Star Trek movie. EW.com muses over a recent LA Times interview with the film's screenwriters. Anyone have anything they'd love to see happen in the sequel? For me, it's less lens flares. ~Diana
'Star Trek' sequel: 'We're looking at a lot of old episodes for inspiration,' say writers | PopWatch
http://popwatch.ew.com/2010/11/30/star-trek-sequel-orci-kurtzman/

popwatch.ew.com
Screenwriters Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci are still in the early stages of writing the sequel to 2009′s Star Trek reboot (likely due in the summer o...
[12/1/10]

Bubonicon
In the spirit of returning levity to this page, I bring you the lost musical opening number of the Doctor Who (Matt Smith) episode of Craig Ferguson. It's pretty much the oddest thing I've seen in a while. Therefore, it's completely awesome.
See Craig Ferguson's Bizarre & Unaired Musical Opening For His DOCTOR WHO/Matt Smith Episode!! --..
http://www.aintitcool.com/node/47627

www.aintitcool.com
A few weeks ago we referenced Matt Smith's appearance on Craig Ferguson's LATE SHOW. Smith is, of course, the current "Doctor" on DOCTOR WHO - introduced on the now-concluded, mostly excellent fifth season of the series.
[12/3/10]

Chris McKitterick
A present to myself for publishing my first novel! Meade Lightbridge 16" Dobsonian reflector telescope. AWESOME.
Astro-stuff
[12/1/10]

Monday, November 22, 2010

Reflections Collections -- 11/22/10

Topics covered:


Reading for the Future is Official!


Reading for the Future is now officially incorporated in the state of Utah.

Dave sent the word out this past Friday, Nov. 19, 2010, writing these words to the rff Talking RFF Yahoo! Group as well as the other RFF groups,
"Articles of Incorporation for Reading for the Future (RFF) were accepted by the State of Utah.  We have a post office box and a bank account.  Next step is 501(c)(3)
Thanks for the support, Dave Anderson"

For months the paperwork has been submitted but there was a request to redo parts. That resulted in a few major decisions that required the Board of Directors, Trustees, and a few committees to discuss, agree on, and describe in terms acceptable to Utah. Finally, all is done.

Dave and others have worked diligently to accomplish this incorporation, fulfilling a dream spawned in the early 1990's, furthered in 1999 with the creation of the various rff Yahoo! Groups. (There were regional and working committee groups in addition to the rff group.) Additionally, most of the fees for incorporation were paid by a few members out-of-pocket (or as sponsors or private donations if you prefer those terms).

In a 10/10/10 email to the group, David Glenn Anderson stated that, "RFF started in 1996 at LACon III as a grassroots organization at the
same time as the first Goldenducks [Awards; see website]."

Reporting on Facebook and the Reflections


Facebook activity is reported in the 2 weekly FB Reports: 11/16/10 and 11/21/10.  In the latest FB report are links to 2 sites useful for teaching with science fiction.

According to Facebook Stats, the Reading For the Future page on Facebook has been viewed daily 623 times and boasts 155 active users.

According to the Blogger Stats, The Reflections blog has been viewed 360 plus times to date, with about half of the visits occurring in November. The most popular page to date is the Krysia Anderson page.

A Hobby for Speculative Fiction Readers


I do not take the best photos. Hence I use photo effects to add interest to images. Then I imagine the world in a fictional universe where the image would match reality. This is a hobby easily taught to children who read books on fantasy and science fiction. Take the children on a photo safari to look for images that match the worlds in the books they are reading. Then let them alter the photos in the weirdest ways. Ask the child to relate the picture to a passage in the fictional book he/she is reading.

Historical Snippet


The second email to the rff Talking RFF Yahoo! Group was from physicist and educator, science fiction fan, and author of the Physics in Science Fiction presentation, Andrew E. Love, Jr. He talked about finding the book Yanked and a series called Last on Earth that he suspected would be YA. The series was a story about 25 teens who found themselves alone on Earth. He also reported, in 1999 mind you, an article from the Washington Post that recommended science fiction for youth:
"4) Science fiction. Start with Robert Heinlein juveniles (e.g. The Star Beast), move up to Jules Verne and a classic anthology such as Adventures in Time and Space, then take the jump to light-speed with some of the great swashbuckling classics, such as Alfred Bester's The Stars My Destination, William Gibson's Neuromancer, Leigh Brackett's The Sword of Rhiannon, and Ursula Le Guin's The Left Hand of Darkness."
per Andy Love,"Summer reading suggestions from Washington Post
http://search.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1999-07/04/080l-070499-idx.html (Sunday July 4, 1999 - probably a link that won't last forever"

Andy Love is another person that helped shape the RFF group of volunteers into the active body of worker bees and sci fi fans that they are. He often asked provocative questions that got the group discussing favorite books, value of science fiction, what makes good sci fi good, etc. He frequently added to the list of YA and suitable books. He has been an active sci fi con participant. And he is still asking and adding, and presenting.

On the Web: Science Fiction Awards Watch and other Awards Lists


I have visited several sites on the web lately that offer awards to authors and illustrators of children's books. Of interest to RFF are those that deal with speculative fiction. Hence, I was excited to find this site that lists awards given to science fiction literature: Science Fiction Awards Watch, http://www.sfawardswatch.com.

In the right panel of the site and its pages is a list of the awards currently listed. Information for the award is submitted by people associated with the award; so if your award is not listed, do contact the site.

Books listed for children and YA on the site that are in a book list appear here: http://www.sfawardswatch.com/?page_id=100 in a list I suspect is incomplete.

SFAW has a page devoted to the Golden Duck Awards that was posted in 2007 and modified in 2009. The 3 different awards presented as Golden Duck Awards are not listed separately in the list of awards in the right panel, but only under the Golden Duck name. (Please note that the SFAW has the Eleanor Cameron Award misspelled.)

In RFF, member Linda Stuckey is active with the Golden Duck Awards, DucKon, and Super-Con-Duck-Tivity. The latter two are organization, convention and major fund raiser for the Golden Duck Awards, which include stipends.

Also not mentioned are the two awards/listings given to children's literature by Cynthia Leitich Smith, http://www.cynthialeitichsmith.com/ and by Cybils, http://www.cybils.com/2010-nominations-fantasyscience-fiction.html.

C.L. Smith and her husband write fantasy novels. Her husband writes specifically for children. Cynthia also critiques novels for children, especially those of the speculative genre, and posts these critiques on her blog.

Cybils Awards are given annually to children's fiction authors as judged by bloggers who volunteer to judge, including youth. This site, too, posts critiques of children's books, especially YA fiction. Cybils is the acronym for Children's and Young Adult Bloggers' Literary Awards.

In researching this post, I came across 2 other awards sites. I promptly posted a link to each on the Reading For the Future page on Facebook. Visit them from there or check out next week's FB Report for the links. Bye for now.

Sunday, November 21, 2010

FB Report: Lots of Links on Speculative Fiction -- 11/21/10

This has been a quiet week on Facebook. 

Reading For the Future "The Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library in Indianapolis will include a replica of his writing studio, his typewriter, an unopened box of his Pall Mall cigarettes, and some rejection letters from publishers. He got lots of rejection letters."
Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Opens in Indianapolis
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/20/us/20vonnegut.html?_r=1&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=a23
www.nytimes.com
The author Kurt Vonnegut’s friends and family agree that his museum belongs in Indianapolis, the hometown with which he had a complicated and not always complimentary relationship.
[11/20/10]


Reading For the Future Teaching with Jules Verne
One of the great resources to be found at our Website!
Reading for the Future
http://www.readingforfuture.com/Jules%20Verne.htm
www.readingforfuture.com
Teaching with Jules Verne. Considered by some “The Father of Science Fiction”, in the 1800’s Jules Verne predicted many of the technologies that are reality today. Though Verne was not a scientist, he did have a passionate interest in it as well as a brilliant imagination. He was one of the few writ...
[11/20/10]

Reading For the Future In researching my next article I came across this site. GREAT books for teaching science including one of my all time favourite short stories Nano Comes to Clifford Falls by Nancy Kress.
10 Books that Prove Science Fiction Just Got Harder
http://io9.com/393397/10-books-that-prove-science-fiction-just-got-harder

io9.com
Why do so many books labeled "hard science fiction" actually contain technology that works pretty much like magic in a fantasy novel? Hard science fiction is supposed to be the branch of SF that's rigorously scientific, and doesn't gloss over difficult problems like faster-than-light travel.
[11/19/10]


Reading For the Future From Lynn E Cohen Koehler...looks like something good to get behind.
Captain Planet Foundation Home
http://www.captainplanetfoundation.org/

www.captainplanetfoundation.org
The mission of the Captain Planet Foundation is to fund and support hands-on, environmental projects for children and youths. Our objective is to encourage innovative programs that empower children and youth around the world to work individually and collectively to solve environmental problems in th...
[11/17/10]

Reading For the Future From Lynn E. Cohen Koehler
Lynn E. Cohen Koehler Anyone going to Philcon? This weekend!
Philcon 2010
http://www.philcon.org/
www.philcon.org
The 2010 Philcon Science Fiction Conference
[11/17/10]

Reading For the Future From Lynn E. Cohen Koehler
Lynn E. Cohen Koehler educational grants for environmental projects
Captain Planet Foundation Home
http://www.captainplanetfoundation.org/
www.captainplanetfoundation.org
[11/17/10]


Reading For the Future for those of you in the SFWA - Nebula Nominations are OPEN
SFWA’s 2010 Nebula Award Nomination period is open
http://www.sfwa.org/2010/11/sfwas-2010-nebula-award-nomination-period-is-open/
www.sfwa.org
SFWA’s 2010 Nebula Award® nomination period is open from November 15, 2010 to February 15, 2011 23:59 PST. Active and Associate SFWA members are eligible to submit nominating ballots. http://www.sfwa.org/nebula-nomination
[11/15/10]

Reading For the Future For the record, my 15 year old son thinks it's CGI
Hatsune Miku: Japanese HOLOGRAPH Plays Sold Out Concerts; Science Fiction Comes To Life (VIDEO)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com//2010/11/11/hatsune-miku-japanese-holograph-_n_782442.html
www.huffingtonpost.com
In what is surely a terrible omen not only for musicians but also the continued existence of the world as we know it, holographs are now playing sold out concerts in, where else, Japan. Holographic idol Hatsune Miku is the creation of the group Crypton Future Media, using software from Vocaloid, and
[11/14/10]

Reading For the Future From David Brin: What
if America lost its knack and desire to make things? My graphic novel,
Tinkerers, is set in 2024, a dystopian future where manufacturing has
declined precipitously; young people head into service careers, and
nearly all innovative products come from overseas. After a catastrophic
...failure, our protagonist searches for answers…Written with Jason Land; Available from Amazon in January. Join the Facebook page
See More
Forward | Graphic Novel
http://forward.msci.org/tinkerers/graphicnovel.html?sms_ss=facebook&at_xt=4cdebd83502448a7%2C0
forward.msci.org
[11/13/10]


Reading For the Future Hey, the first half of science fiction is science, right?
GeekMom » Blog Archive » Five Ways to Teach Science With Star Trek
http://www.geekmom.com/2010/11/five-ways-to-teach-science-with-star-trek/
www.geekmom.com
The class was taught by a man with a magical cabinet. Behind its doors were rows and rows of VHS tapes holding every episode of every season of every Star Trek series that had aired to date. And they weren’t just for rewards after a tough test or days we had a substitute–he used them to teach scienc...
[11/11/10]
---

On valerie's wall from Lynda Williams
Libraries reinvent themselves as they struggle to remain relevant in the digital age
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-libraries-20101112,0,6514361.story
www.latimes.com
Kathy DeGrego's T-shirt lets you know right away she isn't an old-school librarian.
[11/18/10]

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

FB Report: Lots of Links on Speculative Fiction -- 11/16/10

From Valerie's Wall: Chris McKitterick I've been Kindled!
writing [link is to photo album with images of his new book]
http://www.facebook.com/album.php?aid=2449200&id=16829619
Comment from M,Kitterick [11/9/10]Chris McKitterick ... it's a BOOK! If you want to read more, check out some sample chapters here: http://www.sff.net/people/mckitterick/Me/Transcendence1.htm.
[11/9/10]

From Valerie's Wall via David Brin: David Brin
In science fiction, it’s harder to portray a smart, functioning future civilization (i.e. Star Trek) struggling with ongoing conflict, than to rely upon a heroic ubermench in a dystopian setting filled with clueless citizens. Having done away with kings, we still come back to those hierarchies in fiction, as elite saviors are so often chosen on inherent qualities of birth or blood, i.e. Dune, Star Wars, The Matrix…
[11/7/10]

From Valerie's Wall Lynda Williams and 2 other friendsAngela Lott
Krysia Anderson were tagged in Lynda Williams's video.
Okal Rel Event at VCON Oct 2010 [HD]
http://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=486965470978
Filk singing, micro-readings, buttons, crossword and a challenge duel with real fencers featured in the launch for Avim's Oath by Lynda Williams, Misfit Leaves Home by Krysia Anderson and the Opus 4 anthology at VCON in Vancouver, October 2, 2010.
Length: 5:53


From Valerie's Wall: Science Fiction Book Club shared a link.
Comic-Con 2011 :: Registration
www.comic-con.org
Registration information for Comic-Con International 2011. July 21-24, 2011, (Preview Night the 20th) at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, California.
-------

Reading For the Future Clay Griffith & Susan Griffith discuss their new steampunk fantasy novel The Greyfriar: Vampire Empire (Book 1) Attendees are encouraged to dress up in costume!
Upcoming Events for Teens | Flyleaf Books
http://www.flyleafbooks.com/upcoming-events-teens
www.flyleafbooks.com
The Greyfriar: Vampire Empire is the first book in a trilogy of high adventure and alternate history. Combining rousing pulp action with steampunk style, Vampire Empire brings epic political themes to life within a story of heartbreaking romance, sacrifice, and heroism.
[11/8/10]

Reading For the Future 'Libraries have always been there for me.'
I thought you might enjoy this perspective.
The Official PHYLLIS A. WHITNEY Web site - How Libraries Create Authors, by Julie Kramer
http://www.phyllisawhitney.com/articles/other/howlibrariescreateauthors_kramer.htm
www.phyllisawhitney.com
Through her books and articles on the craft of writing, Phyllis A. Whitney inspired countless writers over the years. The following speech given by author Julie Kramer during the Library Journal breakfast at the Public Library Association Conference in Minneapolis
[11/9/10]

Reading for the Future Wall from Laura Lind Reluctant Readers! What’s a Parent to Do?
Cache County School District
http://www.ccsdut.org/resources.cfm?subpage=4328
www.ccsdut.org
Reluctant Readers! What’s a Parent to Do? David E. Forbush Ph.D. Director of Special Education Cache County School District If They Don’t Read Much, How Are They Ever Gonna Get Good!” The relationship between any skill, e.g., basketball, playing an instrument, or driving a golf ball straight down the
[11/9/10]

Reading For the Future
Prize Is Created for Gay Literature for Young Readers
http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/01/prize-is-created-for-gay-literature-for-young-readers/
artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com
The new award, called the Stonewall Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award, is for an English-language book “of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered experience,” the association said on Monday. Stonewall Awards for adult books have been handed out since 197.
[11/10/10]

Reading For the Future
For Elementary, Middle, and High School!
Young Novelist Workbooks | NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program
http://ywp.nanowrimo.org/workbooks
ywp.nanowrimo.org
You have found NaNoWriMo’s 100% awesome, non-lame Young Novelist Workbooks! These are our "Third Editions," brand new for 2010. They are updated for accuracy and are clearer than ever. Our middle and high school books now even have pages on submitting excerpts from a novel for publication!
[11/11/10]

Reading For the Future
Hey, the first half of science fiction is science, right?
GeekMom » Blog Archive » Five Ways to Teach Science With Star Trek
http://www.geekmom.com/2010/11/five-ways-to-teach-science-with-star-trek/
www.geekmom.com
The class was taught by a man with a magical cabinet. Behind its doors were rows and rows of VHS tapes holding every episode of every season of every Star Trek series that had aired to date. And they weren’t just for rewards after a tough test or days we had a substitute–he used them to teach scienc...
[11/11/10]


Reading For the Future From David Brin: What if America lost its knack and desire to make things? My graphic novel,
Tinkerers, is set in 2024, a dystopian future where manufacturing has declined precipitously; young people head into service careers, and nearly all innovative products come from overseas. After a catastrophic...
Forward | Graphic Novel
http://forward.msci.org/tinkerers/graphicnovel.html?sms_ss=facebook&at_xt=4cdebd83502448a7%2C0
forward.msci.org
[11/13/10]

Reading For the Future
For the record, my 15 year old son thinks it's CGI
Hatsune Miku: Japanese HOLOGRAPH Plays Sold Out Concerts; Science Fiction Comes To Life (VIDEO)
http://www.huffingtonpost.com//2010/11/11/hatsune-miku-japanese-holograph-_n_782442.html
www.huffingtonpost.com
In what is surely a terrible omen not only for musicians but also the continued existence of the world as we know it, holographs are now playing sold out concerts in, where else, Japan. Holographic idol Hatsune Miku is the creation of the group Crypton Future Media, using software from Vocaloid, and catastrophic...
[11/14/10]



 

Sunday, November 7, 2010

Reflections Collections -- 11/7/10

 A day early, but hey...!

New Blog Posts

 

Currently in the Works... describes a proposed workshop series to be presented at Worldcon next year in collaboration with AboutSF.

A note to new members tells how to get involved in the volunteer efforts of RFF.

The FB Report...10/31/10 might have been posted a bit late but that does not reduce the wealth of links and comments. And don't forget the latest FB Report...11/7/10.  As of 11/6/10 there were 251 people who "Liked" the Reading For the Future page on Facebook.

Also, I have begun thinking of the FB Report as another newsletter. So I have listed links to the FB Reports in a list on the Newsletter page.

Read A Grab-Bag of Thoughts..., where William Wood, in a comment to David Brin's post on Facebook, 10/23/10, wrote a thoughtful essay on values. He completed the essay with words on the usefulness of science fiction in exploring alternatives. He graciously allowed a reprint of the essay in this blog.

A poem on books by a YA is referenced in the FB Report. The poet has allowed a reprint here. Read about teenager Krysia Anderson and her book and poem.

I set up a blog post that uses comments to add details for science fiction conventions. Add your own comments to help grow the list. Read Upcoming Science Fiction and Fantasy Conventions that Have Come to my Attention--or just skip to the comments.

Last in the list of new posts, there is the KISS, which is mentioned at the end of this one.

Nuggets from the Web

 

Found: this website of children's book abstracts and reviews. The book list is generated by a an author of children's speculative fiction, Cynthia Leitich Smith.

Robert Sawyer, sfwriter.com, tossed out a question for whether a phrase is funny on a Facebook posting,[10/29/10].

Within the resulting comments is the recommendation for reading White's Sector General novels and a clever Tom Swifty: "Isn't this a 'Tom Swifty'? Sort of like 'Take the prisoner downstairs', he said condescendingly," offered D. Hutton.

Reflections gets New Color

 


Cie donated some photos of her ceramic products for use in dressing up the blog. These could refer to works of fantasy or the sci fi of Card, McCaffrey, Lee and Miller, Heinlein, or others since they write tales of dragon-like aliens. With a little photo-editing, they should be usable multiple times each. She also sent a set of royalty-free NASA photos that can be used, including the one above.

What's Up in the RFF Groups

Viewing the Planets Uranus and Jupiter
I sat outside one evening with a pair of binoculars and looked at the brightest evening planet a few nights ago. I saw a white oval image trimmed in blue. Using my sister's phone's Google app--which at the time I thought was an iPhone app; but later discovered that her phone was a different brand--my sister, my brother-in-law, and I identified the oval as the two planets Jupiter and Uranus. However, we could not believe that we were actually viewing Uranus.

Even so, I just had to share my excitement with other RFF members. Knowledgeable members responded with information sent to me via the group messages.

David A. had just written about a member that had responded with the signature "Clear dark skies, good seeing, carpe noctem and ad astra,Project Astro volunteer and EPO volunteer for SAS; Your pace Cowboy Wrangler of Nebulae-Celebrate IYA 2009-- 400 years at the telescope," saying, "Dave D. is basic RFF in the Seattle area. He is [a] guy who knows the stars in the sky on a first name basis." So I asked my question of the group.

"Dave D, Project Astro volunteer and EPO volunteer for SAS; Your Space Cowboy Wrangler of Nebulae- Celebrate IYA 2009-- 400 years at the telescope,

"Last night I viewed the planets Jupiter and Uranus (?) with binoculars. To me the object seems so oblong, white on top and bluish on bottom that I felt as if I was actually seeing Uranus. Unfortunately, I could not steady the binoculars nor focus them sufficiently to see an actual disk (I needed my glasses and probably cataract surgery to boot.). But emotionally, I felt as if I had seen both planets even though logically I know only one was visible at that magnification. At what magnification can one see Uranus now, anyway? We used my sister's iphone app to id the bright planet up at early evening. First time I had seen the app. Useful to me, as I am still a very amateur star-gazer.

"I also understood why people believe in UFO's because holding the binoculars in my hands allowed my pulse to vibrate them. Did that planet ever jump around! It zipped through the viewing field like a hummingbird, flitting from flower to flower and back again, twirling. If I had trusted the steadiness of my hands, I would have sworn that the bright object was on a "controlled flight path."

"The planet was beautiful, even when seen naked-eye.

"Can we figure a way to include the astronomy associations in the blog?"

In response I got this information:
"As for what magnification you can see Uranus at, I know that if you have absolutely perfect conditions, & know exactly where to look, Uranus is actually visible naked eye. Most people don't have anything near perfect conditions (too much light pollution + weather), though, so the magnification you need depends on what your conditions are like. The Clear Sky Clock, at...(for Logan, UT, you can change the location)...can help you determine what your conditions are like. Uranus is conveniently close to Jupiter currently, you can use [this star chart] by Sky & Telescope magazine to track it, or Starry Night or Stellarium (Stellarium's freeware, btw)."[Modified for blog post by VC] ~Laura Swift Lind of StarHouse Discovery Center.

To which David D. responded, "all this is good advice.........."

"As to Uranus, then I did see it! Barely. As an extension of Jupiter. I felt so."~Valerie C.

Laura also provided this additional information:
"A good introductory backyard astronomy book is NightWatch: A Practical Guide to Viewing the Universe by Terence Dickinson, Adolf Schaller, Victor Costanzo, and Roberta Cooke (Sept. 12, 2006)(sic[typo "Sep" corrected])."~Laura Swift Lind of
StarHouse Discovery Center.

And David D. provided this information:
"A 4 inch rich field- f4- telescope using an eyepiece of at least 20mm; is best. Mounting your binoculars to a tripod will help and the best are 7X50 power. Jupiter should appear pale yellow with one black line near the equator- normally has two, second one disappeared recently-don't worry it will be back in coupla years. Uranus is slightly upper right in same field of view and should appear pale blueish green or greenish blue. You can download a freeware planetarium program called Stellarium off the net."

So, People, when viewing the evening sky and seeing the large, bright "star," take a closer look. Soon the two planets will be separated by too many degrees of arc distance to be seen as one white oval trimmed in blue. Such a sight will be decades in returning.

Such a rare site makes the sci fi stories of merchants to the planets and between solar systems more astonishing. If only such travel were actually possible by commercial traders today! Oh, how wonderful is the imagination of our favorite sci fi authors!

~Valerie C.

Making RFF a More Tightly Knit Group

David-Glenn Anderson, founder of the RFF groups, is closing the various regional branches of the RFF Yahoo! Groups and moving the members to the rff Talking Reading for the Future Yahoo! Group, which shows up in one's Yahoo! group listings simply as rff.

This way, he won't have to keep copying messages to the different groups. Also, most members are already members of the main group. Furthermore, group conversations are of interest to most everybody, anyway, so this way we all get to share.

A Note from Valerie

Historically, the conversations have been interesting and chock-full of information concerning links and philosophy and literary critique. At times there have been some personal tidbits. All of which has enabled the group to get to know one another a bit better and has resulted in the group becoming a social network of friends as well as collaborators in the volunteer endeavors aimed at advancing the mission of RFF.

Are you a new member? or thinking of joining? Read about how you can get involved

LOL with Hugs and KISSes
And that brings us to KISS and a discussion of rff group jargon.
 

FB Report: Lots of Links on Speculative Fiction -- 11/7/10

This past week in Reading For the Future page on Facebook
Reading For the Future From Laura Lind - A charter school in Logan, UT needs a library. Currently, they have science books from the 1950's! And not very many books period. They also need to upgrade their building so they can have a room for their ...library, and they need a librarian.
This @bing Our School Needs entry is in the finals. Come vote to help them made it!
ourschoolneeds.discoverbing.com
Our School Needs A Library!, Bear River Charter School, Logan, UT 84321
[11/5/10]

Reading For the Future Kami Marin Garcia posted a site some of you might be very interested in checking out.
YALITCHAT.ORG - we write, read and live YA
yalitchat.ning.com
Membership organization for those interested in fostering the advancement of young adult literature worldwide.
[11/5/10]

Reading For the Future If you are near Seattle...
URSULA K. LeGUIN & ROGER DORBAND at Seattle Public Central Library | The Elliott Bay Book Company
www.elliottbaybook.com
Co-presented with the WASHINGTON CENTER FOR THE BOOK AT THE SEATTLE PUBLIC LIBRARY.
[11/5/10]

Reading For the Future Another find from David Brin. Here he asks if the future of books is at stake. We must wonder what will happen to science fiction and books for children.
Steal This Author | The American Prospect
www.prospect.org
[11/3/10]

Reading For the Future David Brin finds the best stuff. On his page he said, "A fascinating take on the future of Africa, and how the optimism of science fiction can help inspire the next generation of young scientists to use technology to impact and change society: 'If we ever hope to achieve a sustainable level of technological development..., there is a huge Africa-shaped hole in the world of science fiction that must be filled.' –Jonathan Dotse, Science fiction author from Ghana."~Valerie
Fast-Forward: The Future of Science Fiction in Africa
blogs.african-writing.com
Many Drums, One Beat
[11/3/10]

Reading For the Future Thank you Jeff VanderMeer for telling me :)
Omnivoracious: 2010 World Fantasy Award Winners
www.omnivoracious.com
(2010 World Fantasy Award winner The City & The City: one book to rule them all and in the brightness bind them...except for enclaves of The Wind-Up Girl support.) The 2010 World Fantasy Awards, for achievement in 2009, have been..
[10/31/10]

Reading For the Future Thanks David Brin for the link :)
Delay the Decay: How Zombie Biology Would Work | Science Not Fiction | Discover Magazine
blogs.discovermagazine.com
Apocalypse | Halloween is a-comin' and this Sunday brings us AMC's The Walking Dead. In honor of that, we're discussing The Ethics of the Undead here at Science, Not Fiction
[10/31/10]

Reading For the Future 10/30-Orson Welles scared the East Coast with his production of THE WAR OF THE WORLDS.
WOW
www.rense.com
In the fall of 1938, genius extraordinaire Orson Welles, then master of broadcast theatre production for the Columbia Broadcasting System, produced and starred in an exciting on-air dramatization by Howard Koch, based on author H.G. Wells' classic science-fiction "The War of the Worlds"
[10/30/10]
Elsewhere this past week on Facebook
Bobbie DuFault via Twitter Greeting and Salutations. RustyCon is getting closer and closer. We are really gearing up now for the event....
http://fb.me/LsAHX0hB
[11/6/10]

Robert J. Sawyer Settling in for a day of work at the IFWA Write Off. But wait ... do I hear chicken wings calling my name?
[11/6/10]

Jane Fancher Posted a new post on their blog
Humanistic Novels. What's that?
I was having a discussion recently with a dear friend about politics, economics, Ayn Rand, and writing when he asked me a question that brought my side of the conversation to an abrupt end. When I said that I didn't write the same kind of book, that I was ...
[11/6/10]

In comments, J. Fancher, www.janefancher.com RE: The Captain and Lime states on 11/6/10,"Name : CJ Comment: [from blog ] :..."
[quoted from Cj Cherryh`Re: personal communication with J. Fancher, 11/7/10; used with permission~Valerie]

"I think good sf tries to be humanistic, in the actual sense of the word, meaning employing all human attributes in the best way---it's that 'going where no man has gone before' thing: exploring the unknown, ...with all antennae out. Encounting strange ideas, and not being afraid of them.
It's about overcoming fear. Fear of 'wrong thoughts'. Fear of failure. Fear of disapproval. Fear of not measuring up. Fear of discovering something one can't cope with.

"In that sense, science fiction has a real good grip on that 'humanism as a virtue' thing, which is why good sf scares people who are heavily invested in fencing their minds in barbed wire."
We aren't safe. We shouldn't ever be safe. We should make our readers think and wonder, and be always curious."

Furthermore, there was a discussion of the points of fiction that relate to literary critique. I share the discussion between 2 within the numerous comments to the blog post on humanist novels. Thanks to Leigh Perry,
http://www.artistsites.org/bdswaggerArts/, and Jane Fancher,
http://www.closed-circle.net/, for their gracious permission to use their words. [This sentence added 11/9/10]

Partial Discussion on Facebook, 11/6/10, Re: Jane Fancher post on "Humanistic Novels. What's That?"


Leigh Perry Okay, read your article. I would like to add-for myself-that we are also the sum of the exploration of the inside of our own heads. We are a work of sweet imagination made manifest through our need to name ourselves. See, its one thing if s...omeone else labels me... its another entirely when I label myself.

I refuse to close the lid on the gender box.

Jane Fancher @Leigh...totally! My characters are constantly exploring the insides of their heads! Some would say too much! :D As for the gender struggle...of course it's not over, socially or politically. Never said it was. I just tend to write on a br...oader canvas than that. I'm just saying that the struggle for identity...both of self and within a community...is there regardless of gender or talent or money or sexual preference. Bigotry and social scaling is an evil that is not confined to women.

And all I was saying to my friend was that I write from the human/individual side of the equation rather than the political, economic or social side of the issue. I believe you can make all the laws you want, but nothing will really change until the hearts and minds of the people change. And if you change the way people think about one another, the laws won't make a whole lot of difference because the way they are employed will be from an empathetic point of view.
[Jane then added the quote in the box above.]

Leigh Perry (((hug))) @Jane... you rule girl! I wasn't critiszing you, just voicing what was rolling around in my head.

Jane-completely agree with you on the real need to change peoples minds. That it takes a great deal more time than some folks realize. And that that is where lasting change comes from.

The discussion then continued with others and another thread of thought. Deep stuff, but not related to the mission of RFF.~Valerie

Jan Howard Finder ALBACON '11 proudly announces that its Media GoH is Keith DeCandido!
DeCandido.net: The Home Page of Keith R.A. DeCandido
www.sff.net
Annotations of Keith's work:Buffy the Vampire Slayer: BlackoutStar Trek: Articles of the FederationStar Trek: S.C.E.: Many SplendorsStar Trek: A Singular Destiny
[11/6/10]

Of concern to youth is this find of Jane's.


Jan Howard Finder via Kevin Andrew Murphy: GO GEORGE! YOU TELL HIM!
George Takei Speaks Out Against Anti-Gay Bully Clint McCance
www.youtube.com
George Takei's hilarious response to anti-gay bully Clint McCance, former Arkansas school board member who called for more gays teens to kill themselves.
[11/3/10]

Jan Howard Finder likes David Brin's status.
David Brin
A crew from the Colbert Report has just arrived at my house to interview me....on the subject of aliens and possible threats to humanity. What could possibly go wrong?
[11/7/10]


On David Brin's Wall: Chris Galdieri Didn't you feature something like this in Earth?
Scientist Creates a Bot to Argue About Climate Change for Him on Twitter | Slog | The Stranger, Seat
slog.thestranger.com
[11/4/10]

To which Shannon Heimburg replied, 11/5/10, "I want one for evolution."

David Brin via John Grigg: How would we deal with issues of identity if we could make copies of ourselves? Which one would be the real me? A terrific cartoon exploration of some fun philosophical quandaries....and a bit of a take on the concepts in my novel, Kiln People.
John Weldon's "To Be"
www.youtube.com
Canadian animation by John Weldon offering a lighthearted overview of a central problem of ontology: the continuity of existence.
[11/4/10]


The Speculative Fiction Database welcome @gloriaoliver to the site! http://bit.ly/duRd9f #fantasy #ya
Gloria Oliver « The Speculative Fiction Database
bit.ly
Cat slave and Petting Machine extraordinaire. Also a Spec Fic Author with four Fantasy and YA Fantasy novels in print with more on the way three anthologies, and more books on the way. Member in good standing of EPIC and Broad Universe but have yet to make it into Cat Slaves R Us. Sample chapters
[11/6/10]

I did a search of speculative fiction on facebook and got this.
None of the other sites seemed suitable for RFF, except maybe the author sites.  And the Speculative Fiction, which Cie monitors, only relates to the RFF mission sometimes.

You might find the Wikipedia Young-adult fiction of interest.

~Valerie